Stephen Robert

Stephen Robert joined Oppenheimer & Co. in 1968 as a portfolio manager of the Oppenheimer Fund. In 1979, he became President of the firm and in 1983, assumed the role of Chairman and CEO. In March of 1986, he became the principal owner of Oppenheimer through a management buyout. He resigned from the firm in 1997, after selling it to the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. From 2005-2008 he served as Chairman and CEO of Renaissance Institutional Management LLC. Mr. Robert is a member of the Board of the NEXAR Capital Group and a former Director of the Xerox Corp and of the NAC Reinsurance Corporation.http://www.usmep.us/usmep/wp-admin/index.php

Mr. Robert and his wife Pilar Crespi Robert are the founders of The Source of Hope Foundation. Its philanthropic mission is to aid desperate populations, particularly in providing food, water, health care, education and micro finance opportunities. To date, the Foundation’s activities have been primarily in sub-Sahara Africa, Haiti and New York City. He is a Director of Millennium Promise, a humanitarian aid organization with extensive activities in Africa.

Mr. Robert is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and has chaired several study groups for that organization. He is an overseer at the Watson Institute for International Studies. He was Chancellor of Brown University from 1998-2007 and has been a Brown Trustee or Fellow since 1984. He is a trustee of the New York Presbyterian Medical Center and a former Board member of the New York Philharmonic and of Thirteen/WNET. He is also on the Investment Committee of the Peter G. Peterson Foundation.



General Brent Scowcroft, Eric Melby and Henry Siegman

General Brent Scowcroft, Eric Melby and Henry Siegman

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Does America really ‘share values’ with today’s Israel?

In the late sixties or early seventies, when I served as the executive head of the Synagogue Council of America, the coordinating body for certain social action and interreligious activities of the Orthodox, Conservative and Reform national rabbinical and congregational organizations in the United States, I had a private conversation—one of many—with Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, who was considered the leader of modern Orthodoxy in the United States, if not the world.

Rabbi Soloveitchik had just completed a high-level seminar attended by a select group of rabbis and Christian ministers. I asked him if he would agree to lead another such a seminar on the Jewish attachment to the Land of Israel and the concept of “kedushat haaretz” (the holiness of the land), and how these are to be differentiated from concepts such as “blut und boden” (blood and land) at the heart of German fascism and other totalitarian regimes.

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