Nancy Kassebaum-Baker

Senate Years of Service: 1978-1997

Nancy Landon Kassembaum (wife of Howard Henry Baker, Jr., now Nancy Kassebaum-Baker), a Senator from Kansas; born in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kans., July 29, 1932; attended the public schools of Topeka, Kans.; graduated, University of Kansas 1954; received a graduate degree from the University of Michigan 1956; radio station executive, Wichita, Kans.; member, Kansas governmental ethics commission 1975-1976; member, Kansas committee for the humanities 1975-1979; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate, November 7, 1978, for the six-year term commencing January 3, 1979; subsequently appointed by the Governor, December 23, 1978, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of James B. Pearson, for the term ending January 3, 1979; reelected in 1984 and again in 1990 and served from December 23, 1978, to January 3, 1997; not a candidate for reelection in 1996; chairman, Committee on Labor and Human Resources (One Hundred Fourth Congress).

Bibliography

Kassebaum, Nancy Landon. “To Form a More Perfect Union,” Presidential Studies Quarterly 18 (Spring 1988): 241-49; Marshall-White, Eleanor. Women, Catalysts for Change: Interpretive Biographies of Shirley St. Hill Chisholm, Sandra Day O’Connor, and Nancy Landon Kassebaum. New York : Vantage Press, 1991.



General Brent Scowcroft, Eric Melby and Henry Siegman

General Brent Scowcroft, Eric Melby and Henry Siegman

more events »

Israel Provoked This War

There seems to be near-universal agreement in the United States with President Barack Obama’s observation that Israel, like every other country, has the right and obligation to defend its citizens from threats directed at them from beyond its borders.

But this anodyne statement does not begin to address the political and moral issues raised by Israel’s bombings and land invasion of Gaza: who violated the cease-fire agreement that was in place since November 2012 and whether Israel’s civilian population could have been protected by nonviolent means that would not have placed Gaza’s civilian population at risk. As of this writing, the number killed by the Israel Defense Forces has surpassed 600, the overwhelming majority of whom are noncombatants.

read more »