Mission Statement

The U.S./Middle East Project was established in 1994 by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) under the direction of Henry Siegman, a senior fellow on the Middle East at the Council. In 2006, the U.S./Middle East Project became an independent policy institute. Its mission is to provide non partisan analysis of the Middle East peace process and to present policymakers in the United States, in the region and in the larger international community with balanced policy analysis and policy options to prevent conflict and promote stability, democracy, modernization and economic development throughout the region.

The U.S./Middle East Project pursues these goals under the guidance of an International Board chaired first by by General (Ret.) Brent Scowcroft (President, Forum for International Policy; former National Security Adviser to President Gerald Ford and President George H.W. Bush), and now by Ambassador Thomas R. Pickering (Vice Chairman, Hills & Company; former Under Secretary of State; former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations; former Senior Vice President, Boeing Corporation). The International Board comprises eminent personalities with extensive experience, in government and in the private sector, in dealing with the political, economic and social aspects of this critical and troubled region.

The U.S./Middle East Project pursues its mission through a range of activities that include studies, periodicals and publications, conferences, consultations with heads of states in the region and collaboration with a wide range of international agencies pursuing similar goals.



General Brent Scowcroft, Eric Melby and Henry Siegman

General Brent Scowcroft, Eric Melby and Henry Siegman

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Will Greater Israel Transform into Greater Palestine?

The future for Israelis and Palestinians has never been bleaker than it is now, in the wake of the savage assault by two Palestinians on Jewish worshippers in a Jerusalem synagogue.

The trauma of the event falls most heavily on Israelis, for Palestinians in the West Bank have lived for some time now in despair of their future and the future of their children, seeing no end to Israel’s occupation. In contrast, many Israelis have believed that denying millions of Palestinians in the West Bank their right to self-determination and statehood is a “sustainable” state of affairs. This illusion has been shattered by the assault on the Jerusalem synagogue. Israelis are now experiencing some of the insecurity and hopelessness so deeply felt by Palestinians in the Occupied Territories, and also by Israel’s Arabs, particularly the ones in East Jerusalem.

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